3 Year Record High Rates!


November Rates for Truckload Break a 3 year record high with an 18 month streak since June 2014!


The North American Freight Index showed the availability is 39% lower in truckloads. That means Vans & Flatbeds prices are all up with Reefer costs holding strong & steady..


We do our homework at Go123 


  • We use our GGI (God Given Intelligence) before rating our customers. 
  • We cross reference several markets which we pay heavy fees to be a member with to develop the best price for our customers.
  • We study resources like Inbound Logistics for logistics and supply chain articles for news and tools to prepare for the long haul!

Several large carriers like Estes & YRC Freight are opening up opportunities across the Americas. We currently have a competitive advantage as more lanes open up going into Mexico & Canada markets.

More News You Can Use!


Predictions for La Niña - upcoming snowy weather can cause delays and a spike in rates in the shipping industry - be prepared. 

Rounding out the Thomas four by four this week is the category of transportation brokers, also referred to as freight brokers. According to Keith Biondo of Inbound Logistics- a Thomas publication - there are 3 factors helping drive the upward trend in sourcing for transportation brokers.
  1. Hours of Service regulations, or HoS, are limiting the amount of time truck drivers are allowed to spend on the road safely. 
  2. The government's ELD Mandate, or the Electronic Logging Device mandate, will fo into effect this December, and depending on which carrier you ask, this will reduce logged miles for drivers by approximately 5-10%. 
  3. Indicators are that the economy is expected to grow in 2018, which will increase demand for freight services - a demand will grow while factors such as Hos end ELD shrink capacity. Clearly, it looks like shippers that need to move freight are trying to get their ducks in a row for 2018 right now.


ELD Mandate shows only 3/4 of all small fleets are ELD Compliant - this means nearly 1 quarter of small fleet trucks are missing in the upcoming market which can affect rating and booking times.

November Rates for Truckload Break a 3 year record high with an 18 month streak since June 2014! The North American Freight Index...

ELD Mandate - The Good, The Bad & The Ugly

The ELD is basically an electronic logging device — used to electronically record a driver’s Record of Duty Status (RODS), which replaces the paper logbook some drivers currently use to record their compliance with Hours of Service (HOS) requirements. This mandate was introduced in December 2015, then implemented in December 2017 and all drivers must comply by December 18, 2019.



Despite the protests from California to Florida, recent studies have proven that many drivers who have implemented the ELDs say they will never return to paper logging. 

Are truckers planning to quit & sell their rigs? 


“If there’s a race to the exit, there’s no evidence of it,” said Ken Harper, director of marketing for the load board and freight-rate aggregator.

DAT survey results were a bag of mixed nuts at its annual user meeting in Portland, Ore. The information was compiled from three separate surveys DAT conducted during the summer and early fall 2017 with 1,000 owner-operators and carriers with fleets of up to 250 trucks on its mailing list. 

The same goes for our willingness for CHANGE.  Truckers’ willingness to work under the new mandate varies by age, with drivers 61 and older as likely to say they will quit & leave rather than get an ELD as they are to say they’ll stay in the business, said Peggy Dorf, a DAT market analyst. By contrast, drivers in their 30s to 50s are twice as likely to stay with the industry and already had an ELD, she said. So the younger are proponents of the technological advances and the old, well, let's just say are against change. 


So we broke it all down for you in 3 scenarios:

GOOD - 


  • Reduce time spent on paperwork, reduces paper use, brings logging into the modern age
  • Impossible to be pressured by Employers
  • Better dispatch planning
  • Smart ELDs - the technology syncs with smart phones and tables
  • Drivers do not need to be tethered to their cabs with Smart phone cababilities
  • Modern Maintenance alerts help reduce breakdowns
  • Saves lives due to fatigue related accidents on the roads

BAD -

  • More government regulations are encroaching on privacy of truck drivers
  • Cost - the average cost is $450 - $1000 per unit, so if a fleet has over 200 trucks, you do the math, the cost varies depending on extra bells & whistles
  • Long loading time? Many truckers have complained about long loading times taking away from driving time
  • Since this technology is still new, the bugs and glitches are in the works, frustrating usage altogether
  • If many truckers do leave the market this could affect capacity and prices for consumers

UGLY -

  • Truck drivers feel the need to drive faster to make up for time spent required resting
  • Research from 2011-2014 comparing trucks with ELDs and trucks without ELDs showing no significant change in fatigue related accident statistics. So the worst case scenario is that the implementation of the ELD Mandate changes nothing.

Matt. M asked Trucker Terry, moving a recent truckload for Go123 Logistics, his thoughts about his newly installed ELD. "After driving to the pick up and having a 5 hour load time, I couldn't go anywhere and had to sit in the parking lot overnight, forcing me to drive higher speeds than I normally do to make up for lost time."  he went on to say, "If they don't get the technological glitches fixed by the end of January, I am gonna sell my rig and get out of the business."

So we have laid it all out for you, the good, the bad and the ugly. The ELD Mandate combined with a Fleet Management System can propel trucking into 21st Century technology. A recent article proves that technology benefits the industry overall and saves lives. These fleet management systems (FMS) offer more comprehensive features (which deliver more significant benefits), allowing fleets to further slash costs and make life easier for drivers, including:

  1. Decreased Fuel Costs: By monitoring excessive truck idle times or speeding events, fleets can build incentive programs for truck drivers that help increase fuel efficiency.
  2. Reduced Truck Downtime: Fleet management system users can see reduced vehicle downtimes of 15% and improved vehicle utilization of 13%, according to studies by the Aberdeen Group.
  3. Lowered Total Crash Rates: Based on data from the Center for Truck and Bus Safety of Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, drivers using E-Logs had a significantly lower total crash rate (a 11.7% reduction) and a significantly lower preventable crash rate (a 5.1% reduction) than trucks not equipped with electronic driver logs.
  4. Simplified Regulatory Compliance: While complying with the ELD mandate, other regulations can also be easily satisfied, including Driver Vehicle Inspection Reports and IFTA.


The ELD is basically an electronic logging device — used to electronically record a driver’s Record of Duty Status (RODS), which replaces t...

Shipping Market Update & ELD Mandate



Van, Flatbed & Reefer loads are up 64% this week and month over last month. There are also 96% more loads this year this month compared to last year this month according to DAT. This creates a spike in the industry regarding supply and demand for truckloads across the USA. 

LTL - It is December, so if you need a shipment within a certain time frame, order GUARANTEED DELIVERY. This is an extra service charge offered by the carriers and is especially important this time of year due to increased traffic in the regional terminals. ETAs are slower in December and if you need it there by a certain date, order GUARANTEED SERVICE. 

More News You Can Use


ELD Mandate - The Electronic Logging Device will go into effect this December and many truckers are expected to protest this new technology. Some truckers might not want to upgrade their rigs with this technology, so we might see another rate spike due to plain old supply & demand. 

What is the ELD Mandate? Every trucker is required by law to take a 34 hour weekend reset every 5 days. They can take more of a break, but not less. The ELD is the device installed directly to the engine of any truck over 10,000 lbs and newer than 2000. For more information, read our article: ELD Mandate - The Good, The Bad & The Ugly or visit The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.  

December 22nd - January 1st are typically a very slow time in this business. Guaranteed Services are necessary to move your freight if at all. 

Van, Flatbed & Reefer loads are up 64% this week and month over last month. There are also 96% more loads this year this month co...

News You Can Use!



Reefers Hit a 3-year Hight and Vans to follow. Flatbeds have held steady. The West coast is cranking right now for all kinds of freight. NW & SW are up $1 per mile and IntraCalifornia is almost $.50 up from last year. TX rates are up as well. LA to Dallas held steady.

...more NEWS YOU CAN USE!

Last quarter is showing steady annual gains in brokered 3PL shipments. Not only can the customer get better rates, it is combined with our superior services.

FEDEX is buying 100 new flying delivery trucks. They are buying 50 trucks initially adding roughly 1 per month for 4 years and holds options for 50 more. This is to support our accumulative nature and to be competitive to the Amazon drone market which is taking on more of the delivery availability in the market.

Reefers Hit a 3-year Hight and Vans to follow. Flatbeds have held steady. The West coast is cranking right now for all kinds of fre...

LTL ETA's - Nothing is Guaranteed Unless You Pay



LTL shipments are the fastest and most economical way to move a shipment larger than a parcel, but smaller than a truckload consisting of as little as 1 pallet, crate or bundle and as many as 10 standard pallets (L48" x W40" x H48").  The time in which it takes an LTL shipment to make its destination seems to be one of the biggest questions and misunderstood expectations with our customers. So let's lay it out for you.


  • Your LTL shipment is picked up by the carrier in a city truck, provided it is properly prepared for shipping
  • It is then taken to the origin terminal where it is checked through dimensional scanners for size, weight, density and class
  • The shipment is then loaded onto a Linehaul trailer. A Linehaul trailer is a full semi-trailer. 
  • There, your shipment sits in that trailer with other shipments waiting for that Linehaul trailer to fill. 
  • Once that Linehaul trailer is full, it hits the road. 
  • Depending on the destination, there could be several terminal stops along the way, where shipments, along with yours are unloaded and new shipments are loaded at each terminal stop. This is where delays may occur. If the Linehaul trailer does not fill, then that trailer will sit an extra day until it is full and ready to make the next terminal. 
  • Ultimately, the Linehaul truck arrives at the destination terminal where your shipment is unloaded and then loaded on city trucks once again to be delivered to your destination. 
*INTERSTATE - 1-2 DAYS

*CROSS COUNTRY - 7-10 DAYS, and everything in between

What other Factors can Cause Delays?

Weather, traffic, terminal back-ups, breakdowns, holidays and human error can all delay your shipment. If you are going cross country on long distances, the LTL carrier can chose to put your shipment on rail. 

Got a Time Sensitive Delivery?

If your shipment must meet a deadline, then there are guaranteed, express options and you can even overnight by air. These accessorial charges can be arranged with us. 

Though we have focused on what could delay your shipment, it is only in an effort to under-promise and over-deliver. Most LTL carriers, some better than others, are consistent with their estimated time of arrivals, but nothing is guaranteed unless you pay. 

Please contact us to move your next LTL shipment - Go123 Land, Air, Sea, your full service logistics experts!





LTL shipments are the fastest and most economical way to move a shipment larger than a parcel, but smaller than a truckload consistin...

NMFC Codes

The National Motor Freight Classification®


The Standard for Freight Identification and Classification

The National Motor Freight Classification® (NMFC®) is a standard that provides a comparison of commodities moving in interstate, intrastate and foreign commerce. It is similar in concept to the groupings or grading systems that serve many other industries. Commodities are grouped into one of 18 classes—from a low of class 50 to a high of class 500—based on an evaluation of four transportation characteristics: density, handling, stowability and liability. Together, these characteristics establish a commodity’s “transportability.”

By analyzing commodities on the basis of the four transportation characteristics and ONLY on the basis of those characteristics, the NMFC provides both carriers and shippers with a standard by which to begin negotiations and greatly simplifies the comparative evaluation of the many thousands of products moving in today’s competitive marketplace.


The Standard for Packaging, Rules and Bills of Lading

The NMFC specifies minimum packaging requirements to ensure that goods are adequately protected and can be handled and stowed in a manner that is reasonably safe and practicable so as to withstand the normal rigors of the less-than-truckload environment. It contains various rules that govern and otherwise relate to the classification and/or packaging of commodities as well as procedures for the filing and disposition of claims, and procedures governing interline settlements. It also contains the Uniform Straight Bill of Lading, including its Terms and Conditions.

The National Motor Freight Classification is a comprehensive, invaluable resource for transportation and packaging professionals. 


Freight classes are designed to help you get common standardized freight pricing for your shipment when working with different carriers, warehouses and brokers.


Class NameCostNotes, ExamplesWeight Range Per Cubic Foot
Class 50 – Clean FreightLow ↓ CostFits on standard shrink-wrapped 4X4 pallet, very durableover 50 lbs
Class 55Bricks, cement, mortar, hardwood flooring35-50 pounds
Class 60Car accessories & car parts30-35 pounds
Class 65Car accessories & car parts, bottled beverages, books in boxes22.5-30 pounds
Class 70Car accessories & car parts, food items, automobile engines15 to 22.5 pounds
Class 77.5Tires, bathroom fixtures13.5 to 15 pounds
Class 85Crated machinery, cast iron stoves12-13.5 pounds
Class 92.5Computers, monitors, refrigerators10.5-12 pounds
Class 100boat covers, car covers, canvas, wine cases, caskets9-10.5 pounds
Class 110cabinets, framed artwork, table saw8-9 pounds
Class 125Small Household appliances7-8 pounds
Class 150Auto sheet metal parts, bookcases,6-7 pounds
Class 175Clothing, couches stuffed furniture5-6 pounds
Class 200Auto sheet metal parts, aircraft parts, aluminum table, packaged mattresses,4-5 pounds
Class 250Bamboo furniture, mattress and box spring, plasma TV3-4 pounds
Class 300wood cabinets, tables, chairs setup, model boats2-3 pounds
Class 400Deer antlers1-2 pounds
Class 500 – Low Density or High ValueHigh ↑ CostBags of gold dust, ping pong ballsLess than 1 lbs.
Freight classes (there are 18 of them) are based on weight, length and height, density, ease of handling, value and liability from things like theft, damage, break-ability and spoilage. For the most part, the lower the NMFC class number, the lower the freight charge.  Go123Logistics can help you figure out your NMFC freight class, insuring the specialized code is correct. This insures that you get correct and consistent pricing for your freight on time. The following table describes the NMFC classes and is meant for general guidance in picking your freight class, a number of factors influence what class your shipment ends up in.

When looking into NMFC’s and figuring out a freight class, a number of commodities are density based, so you need to know the Pounds per Cubic Foot, or PCF of the item.  To get an idea of your PCF, use our Density Calculator.  As an example of how density affects freight class, consider this:
  • The space a foam mattress takes up is equal to the space of several pieces of plywood, but they weigh in completely different.   
  • The density of the raw wood materials is much greater than the density of the foam itself.  
  • Since big lightweight items take up a lot of space in the trailer, the carrier’s charge for the space used based on its density.

Getting the freight class wrong will cost you. If you incorrectly classify your item to be shipped it can be reclassified by the freight carrier and cause delays. Disputing this is difficult, time consuming and you will be charged the difference (usually without a discount). 

Getting the Right Code 

There are several things you can to to get the right NMFC Code: 
  • Contact Us 
  • Contact the manufacturer of your item, most often they will know the NMFC codes for their products 
  • Call the National Motor Freight Traffic Association 
Do you need to ship freight right now, need an expert to help? Contact us, chat live or get a freight quote right now, remember, we are here to help at Go123Logistics.

The National Motor Freight Classification® The Standard for Freight Identification and Classification The National Motor Freight Classif...

Internet and Bluetooth Advances

Experts say "By the year 2020, there will be 25 billion connected devices in use, representing a 30-fold increase over today" representing a 30-fold increase over today. With advancements in technology, more and more industries are embracing this change. 


What can this technology offer in the freight shipping industry?

  • Visibility - now consumers can shop for better quotes and hold their shipping agents accountable for high prices, they can utilize the internet to shop for better prices
  • Tracking - with GPS enabled date and location services, the customer and dispatch team can track delivery times with precise details
  • Multitasking - fuel cost would be cut since fleet routes can be optimized with monitored traffic status allowing more loads to be added along certain routes, with enhanced location data and last minute pick-up & add-on availability
  • Speedier Service and Less Pit Stops - Sensor-equipped trucks and GPS technology enable further supply chain productivity. This technology alerts corporate maintenance facilities when trucks need service for their brakes, tires, oil or any other critical systems. When maintenance crews get this information in advance - truck companies can avoid the extra expense of road repairs and delays of freight due to unexpected break-downs
  • Enhanced Data Accessibility - fleet managers and drivers alike can save fuel and drive more efficiently with more knowledge thanks to the superior visibility, tracking and maintenance free driving, ultimately delivering on time and keeping the end user happier, the client
  • Better Rates Overall - with all these combined benefits, shippers can deliver with better rates, offering better rates to the consumer

Few industries can claim to have a level of technology to equal that found in the logistics industry, and future advancements are primed to reveal and generate some of the most significant technological changes in the industry throughout history. From the ability to automatically generate reports from Internet of Things (IoT), radio frequency identification (RFID), and Bluetooth-enabled devices to the increasing focus on an omni channel solution to acquiring new customers, technology in the logistics industry will continue to grow and improve in accuracy, function and efficiency.

Although some of these technologies have been around for a while, they are just now starting to be used to the best of their ability for the logistics industry in 2016, paving the road for even more advances in efficiency and safety for carriers and consumers.



Experts say "By the year 2020, there will be 25 billion connected devices in use, representing a 30-fold increase over today" rep...

How to Class LTL Freight

For Example: Freight class: concrete furnishings, benches, balusters, ashtrays, tables, etc.

After much research and some trial and error, we have landed on the following info for the LTL freight class of concrete furnishings. This includes things like concrete balusters, concrete tables, concrete bases, and similar products usually are classed at class 60, and use an NMFC# of 78820. Sometimes these are referred to as concrete furbishing as well. It is made up of pre-cast concrete items.  Here’s an example picture:


This also can include:
  • Ashtrays
  • Bicycle Racks
  • Bench Ends
  • Benches
  • Benches and Tables (together)
  • Bollards
  • Planters
  • Sundials
  • Tables
  • And last but not least Tree Grates in crates
Hope this helps!  For more detailed information on how to class your freight, check out our complete list of NMFC CodesCustoms Codes. If so, please let us know- and let us quote this move for you, as this is one of the things we specialize in here at Go123Logistics.  Contact us right away for a quick quote - and now enjoy having us take care of you and all your shipping needs.

For Example: Freight class: concrete furnishings, benches, balusters, ashtrays, tables, etc. After much research and some trial and err...

Solar Advancements for Refrigerated Trucks

We just read an awesome article about solar energy specifically for refrigerated trucks. This is a cool new alternative to maintain a green footprint while getting your clients their needs when dealing with temperature controlled environments for long hauls.
Carrier Transicold Thin Film Flexible Solar Panels are designed to maintain the refrigeration unit’s battery charge. Photo: Carrier Transicold
Transport refrigeration system batteries are increasingly being tapped to power additional electronics such as telematics devices, fuel-level sensors, interior trailer lighting and other accessories. Because these accessories can continue to draw power – sometimes up to a few amps per hour – while the refrigeration unit is off, the reefer battery might not have enough charge to start the engine if the unit has not been operated for some time. That could mean an expensive jump-start, and it also means trailers drop off of asset-tracking systems. But now, thanks to new technology by Carrier Transicold and other manufacturers, and advancements in solar energy, no need to worry about the shipment arriving on time, cold and stress free.

We just read an awesome article about solar energy specifically for refrigerated trucks. This is a cool new alternative to maintain a green...

Safe Packaging

All freight is usually handled several times during transit, often by different carriers. It must be packaged to protect it from scuffing, vibration, crushing, dropping, humidity, and condensation. Go123Logistics highly recommends practicing safe packaging - load freight onto pallets or package freight into crates, or use sturdy shipping containers such as corrugated fiberboard boxes. Carriers have published tariffs that provide some guidance for packaging. Packaging engineers design and test packaging to meet the specific needs of the logistics system and the product being shipped.
Proper packaging freight serves several purposes:
  • It helps protect the freight from handling and transit damage.
  • It helps protect other freight from being damaged by your freight.
  • It helps reduce package pilferage.
  • It helps to avoid loss situations; situations in which some of your freight is separated from the rest and lost in transit.
  • It helps protect the freight from ultimately being returned to sender. 

All freight is usually handled several times during transit, often by different carriers. It must be packaged to protect it from scuffing, ...

LTL 101 - Less than Truckload

LTL is the transportation of relatively small freight, but larger than regular parcel mail like what would normally ship via FedEx Ground, or UPS or U.S. Mail parcel services (about 150 pounds) to just under what would usually be considered a Truck Load at about 20,000 pounds or more than 14 pallets. LTL common carriers are also more likely to accept loose (non-palletized) cargo than the other cargos. LTL shipments typically weigh between 151 and 20,000 lb (68 and 9,072 kg).

While routes tend to be more casual, the main advantage to using an LTL carrier is that a shipment may be transported for a fraction of the cost of hiring an entire truck and trailer for an exclusive shipment. Also, a number of accessory services are available from LTL carriers, which are not typically offered by FTL carriers. These optional services include liftgate service at pickup or delivery, residential (also known as "non-commercial") service at pickup or delivery, inside delivery, notification prior to delivery, freeze protection, and others.


LTL is the transportation of relatively small freight, but larger than regular parcel mail like what would normally ship via FedEx Ground, ...

TL 101 - Truckload

TL is the transportation of large amounts of homogeneous cargo, generally the amount necessary to fill an entire semi-trailer or intermodal container (refrigerated). A truckload carrier is a trucking company that generally contracts an entire trailer-load to a single customer. This is as opposed to a less than truckload (LTL) company that generally mixes freight from several customers in each trailer. One advantage Full Truckload (FTL) carriers have over Less than Truckload carriers is that the freight is never handled en route, whereas an LTL shipment will typically be transported on several different trailers. As with LTL, TL should also be packaged or loaded onto pallets for unit loads. Sturdy shipping containers such as crates or corrugated fiberboard boxes are commonly used . 

A typical full truckload for a dry van trailer consists of 24 standard pallets of cargo that weighs up to 42,000 lbs. (or more).



TL is the transportation of large amounts of homogeneous cargo, generally the amount necessary to fill an entire semi-trailer or intermodal...

Shipping 101

When shipping your commodity by land, there are 4 basic options to choose from:
  • LTL - Lighter Than Truckload 
  • FTL - Full Truckload 
  • Reefer - Refrigerated

Less Than Truckload 

LTL is the transportation of relatively smaller quantities of freight, and is usually moved on a pallet, and may be several pallets via one of the common carriers that are seen across the highways of North. As the name implies, these shipments usually consist of several pallets, pieces or cartons and almost all LTL common carriers are also more likely to accept loose (non-palletized) cargo than the traditional carriers. LTL shipments typically weigh between 151 and 20,000 lb (68 and 9,072 kg).
While routes tend to be more casual, the main advantage to using an LTL carrier is that a shipment may be transported for a fraction of the cost of hiring an entire truck and trailer for an exclusive shipment. Also, a number of accessory services are available from LTL carriers, which are not typically offered by FTL carriers. These optional services include liftgate service at pickup or delivery, residential (also known as "non-commercial") service at pickup or delivery, inside delivery, notification prior to delivery, freeze protection, and several others.

Truckload

TL is the transportation of larger amounts of cargo, generally the amount necessary to fill an entire semi-trailer, open deck trailer (like a flatbed or stepdeck) or into an enclosed sea or rail container. A truckload carrier is a trucking company that generally contracts an entire trailer-load to a single customer. This is as opposed to a less-than truckload (LTL) company that generally mixes freight from several customers in each trailer. One advantage Full Truckload (FTL) carriers have over Less than Truckload carriers is that the freight is never trans-loaded en route, whereas an LTL shipment will typically be –loaded multiple times as it moves from origin to destination. Truckload shipments also should also be packaged, loaded, blocked or braced, A typical full truckload for a dry van trailer consists of 26 standard pallets of cargo that weighs up to 44,000 lbs., although many carriers will not carry loads that are maxed out.  Open deck freight usually has  maximum weight limit of 48,000 lbs.

Reefer - Refrigerated Trucks

A refrigerated container or reefer is an intermodal container (shipping container) used in intermodal freight transport that is refrigerated for the transportation of temperature sensitive cargo. While a reefer will have an integral refrigeration unit, they rely on external power, from electrical power points (“reefer points”) at a land based site, a container ship or on quay. When being transported over the road on a trailer or via rail, they can be powered from diesel powered generators ("gen sets") which attach to the container whilst on road journeys. Refrigerated containers are capable of controlling temperature ranging from -30C, -40C, -65C up to 30C, 40C.

The impact on society of reefer containers is vast, allowing consumers all over the world to enjoy fresh produce at any time of year and experience previously unavailable fresh produce from many other parts of the world.


When shipping your commodity by land, there are 4 basic options to choose from: LTL - Lighter Than Truckload  FTL - Full Truckload  Re...

LTL Partners

Central to the idea of moving freight with confidence, we are teaming up with initiatives and organizations that are strengthening our global entrepreneurial infrastructure. Check out some of our LTL partners leading the charge with innovation, efficiency and technology.


Central to the idea of moving freight with confidence, we are teaming up with initiatives and organizations that are strengthening our globa...

Customs Codes


This page contains the chapter-by-chapter listing of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule and general notes.  The links below correspond to the various sections in the Table of Contents for the Harmonized Tariff Schedule.  Clicking on a link will load the corresponding Adobe .pdf file

(Note: Section notes, if any, are attached to the first chapter of each section. "Page down" to view chapter after selecting.)

Section I:Live Animals; Animal Products
Chapter 1Live animals
Chapter 2Meat and edible meat offal
Chapter 3Fish and crustaceans, molluscs and other aquatic invertebrates
Chapter 4Dairy produce; birds eggs; natural honey; edible products of animal origin, not elsewhere specified or included
Chapter 5Products of animal origin, not elsewhere specified or included 
Section II:Vegetable Products
Chapter 6Live trees and other plants; bulbs, roots and the like; cut flowers and ornamental foliage
Chapter 7Edible vegetables and certain roots and tubers
Chapter 8Edible fruit and nuts; peel of citrus fruit or melons
Chapter 9Coffee, tea, maté and spices
Chapter 10Cereals
Chapter 11Products of the milling industry; malt; starches; inulin; wheat gluten
Chapter 12Oil seeds and oleaginous fruits; miscellaneous grains, seeds and fruits; industrial or medicinal plants; straw and fodder
Chapter 13Lac; gums, resins and other vegetable saps and extracts
Chapter 14Vegetable plaiting materials; vegetable products not elsewhere specified or included 
Section III:Animal or Vegetable Fats and Oils and Their Cleavage Products; Prepared Edible Fats; Animal or Vegetable Waxes
Chapter 15Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their cleavage products prepared edible fats; animal or vegetable waxes
Section IV:Prepared Foodstuffs; Beverages, Spirits, and Vinegar; Tobacco and Manufactured Tobacco Substitutes
Chapter 16Preparations of meat, of fish or of crustaceans, molluscs or other aquatic invertebrates
Chapter 17Sugars and sugar confectionery
Chapter 18Cocoa and cocoa preparations
Chapter 19Preparations of cereals, flour, starch or milk; bakers' wares
Chapter 20Preparations of vegetables, fruit, nuts or other parts of plants
Chapter 21Miscellaneous edible preparations
Chapter 22Beverages, spirits and vinegar
Chapter 23Residues and waste from the food industries; prepared animal feed
Chapter 24Tobacco and manufactured tobacco substitutes
Section V:Mineral Products
Chapter 25
Salt; sulfur; earths and stone; plastering materials, lime and cement
Chapter 26
Ores, slag and ash
Chapter 27
Mineral fuels, mineral oils and products of their distillation; bituminous substances; mineral waxes
Section VI:Products of the Chemical or Allied Industries
Chapter 28Inorganic chemicals; organic or inorgani c compounds of precious metals, of rare-earth metals,of radioactive elements or of isotopes
Chapter 29Organic chemicals
Chapter 30Pharmaceutical products
Chapter 31Fertilizers
Chapter 32Tanning or dyeing extracts; dyes, pigments, paints, varnishes, putty and mastics 
Chapter 33Essential oils and resinoids; perfumery, cosmetic or toilet preparations
Chapter 34Soap, organic surface-active agents, washing preparations, lubricating preparations, artificial waxes, prepared waxes, polishing or scouring preparations, candles and similar articles, modeling pastes, "dental waxes" and dental preparations with a basis of plaster
Chapter 35Albuminoidal substances; modified starches; glues; enzymes
Chapter 36Explosives; pyrotechnic products; matches; pyrophoric alloys; certain combustible preparations
Chapter 37Photographic or cinematographic goods
Chapter 38Miscellaneous chemical products
Section VII:Plastics and Articles Thereof Rubber and Articles Thereof
Chapter 39Plastics and articles thereof
Chapter 40Rubber and articles thereof
Section VIII:Raw Hides and Skins, Leather, Furskins and Articles Thereof; Saddlery and Harness; Travel Goods, Handbags and Similar Containers; Articles of Animal Gut (Other Than Silkworm Gut)
Chapter 41Raw hides and skins (other than furskins) and leather
Chapter 42Articles of leather; saddlery and harness; travel goods, handbags and similar containers; articles of animal gut (other than silkworm gut)
Chapter 43Furskins and artificial fur; manufactures thereof
Section IX:Wood and Articles of Wood; Wood Charcoal; Cork and Articles of Cork; Manufacturers of Straw,of Esparto or of Other Plaiting Materials; Basketware and Wickerwork
Chapter 44Wood and articles of wood; wood charcoal
Chapter 45Cork and articles of cork
Chapter 46Manufactures of straw, of esparto or of other plaiting materials; basketware and wickerwork
Section X:Pulp of Wood or of Other Fibrous Cellulosic Material; Waste and Scrap of Paper or Paperboard; Paper and Paperboard and Articles Thereof
Chapter 47Pulp of wood or of other fibrous cellulosic material; waste and scrap of paper or paperboard
Chapter 48Paper and paperboard; articles of paper pulp, of paper or of paperboard
Chapter 49Printed books, newspapers, pictures and other products of the printing industry; manuscripts, typescripts and plans
Section XI:Textile and Textile Articles
Chapter 50Silk
Chapter 51Wool, fine or coarse animal hair; horsehair yarn and woven fabric
Chapter 52Cotton
Chapter 53Other vegetable textile fibers; paper yarn and woven fabric of paper yarn
Chapter 54Man-made filaments
Chapter 55Man-made staple fibers
Chapter 56Wadding, felt and nonwovens; special yarns, twine, cordage, ropes and cables and articles thereof
Chapter 57Carpets and other textile floor coverings
Chapter 58Special woven fabrics; tufted textile fabrics; lace, tapestries; trimmings; embroidery
Chapter 59Impregnated, coated, covered or laminated textile fabrics; textile articles of a kind suitable for industrial use
Chapter 60Knitted or crocheted fabrics
Chapter 61Articles of apparel and clothing accessories, knitted or crocheted
Chapter 62Articles of apparel and clothing accessories, not knitted or crocheted
Chapter 63Other made up textile articles; sets; worn clothing and worn textile articles; rags
Section XII:Footwear, Headgear, Umbrellas, Sun Umbrellas, Walking Sticks, Seatsticks, Whips, Riding-Crops and Parts Thereof; Prepared Feathers and Articles Made Therewith; Artificial Flowers; Articles of Human Hair
Chapter 64
Footwear, gaiters and the like; parts of such articles
Chapter 65
Headgear and parts thereof
Chapter 66
Umbrellas, sun umbrellas, walking sticks, seatsticks, whips, riding-crops and parts thereof
Chapter 67
Prepared feathers and down and articles made of feathers or of down; artificial flowers; articles of human hair
Section XIII:Articles of Stone, Plaster, Cement, Asbestos, Mica or Similar Materials; Ceramic Products; Glass and Glassware
Chapter 68
Articles of stone, plaster, cement, asbestos, mica or similar materials
Chapter 69
Ceramic products
Chapter 70
Glass and glassware
Section XIV:Natural or Cultured Pearls, Precious or Semiprecious Stones, Precious Metals, Metals Clad With Precious Metal, and Articles Thereof; Imitation Jewelry; Coin
Chapter 71Natural or cultured pearls, precious or semi-precious stones,precious metals, metals clad with precious metal and articles thereof; imitation jewelry; coin
Section XV:Base Metals and Articles of Base Metal
Chapter 72Iron and steel
Chapter 73Articles of iron or steel
Chapter 74Copper and articles thereof
Chapter 75Nickel and articles thereof
Chapter 76Aluminum and articles thereof
Chapter 77(Reserved for possible future use)
Chapter 78Lead and articles thereof
Chapter 79Zinc and articles thereof
Chapter 80Tin and articles thereof
Chapter 81Other base metals; cermets; articles thereof
Chapter 82Tools, implements, cutlery, spoons and forks, of base metal; parts thereof of base metal
Chapter 83Miscellaneous articles of base metal
Section XVI:Machinery and Mechanical Appliances; Electrical Equipment; Parts Thereof; Sound Recorders and Reproducers, Television Image and Sound Recorders and Reproducers, and Parts and Accessories of Such Articles
Chapter 84Nuclear reactors, boilers, machinery and mechanical appliances; parts thereof
Chapter 85Electrical machinery and equipment and parts thereof; sound recorders and reproducers, television image and sound recorders and reproducers, and parts and accessories of such articles
Section XVII:Vehicles, Aircraft, Vessels and Associated Transport Equipment
Chapter 86Railway or tramway locomotives, rolling-stock and parts thereof; railway or tramway track fixtures and fittings and parts thereof; mechanical (including electro-mechanical) traffic signalling equipment of all kinds
Chapter 87Vehicles other than railway or tramway rolling stock, and parts and accessories thereof
Chapter 88Aircraft, spacecraft, and parts thereof
Chapter 89Ships, boats and floating structures
Section XVIII:Optical, Photographic, Cinematographic, Measuring, Checking, Precision, Medical or Surgical Instruments and Apparatus; Clocks and Watches; Musical Instruments; Parts and Accessories Thereof
Chapter 90
Optical, photographic, cinematographic, measuring, checking, precision, medical or surgical instruments and apparatus; parts and accessories thereof
Chapter 91
Clocks and watches and parts thereof
Chapter 92
Musical instruments; parts and accessories of such articles
Section XIXArms and Ammunition; Parts and Accessories Thereof
Chapter 93
Arms and ammunition; parts and accessories thereof
Section XX:Miscellaneous Manufactured Articles
Chapter 94
Furniture; bedding, mattresses, mattress supports, cushions and similar stuffed furnishings; lamps and lighting fittings, not elsewhere specified or included; illuminated sign illuminated nameplates and the like; prefabricated buildings
Chapter 95
Toys, games and sports requisites; parts and accessories thereof
Chapter 96
Miscellaneous manufactured articles
Section XXI:Works of Art, Collectors' Pieces and Antiques
Chapter 97
Works of art, collectors' pieces and antiques
Section XXII:Special Classification Provisions; Temporary Legislation; Temporary Modifications Proclaimed pursuant to Trade Agreements Legislation; Additional Import Restrictions Proclaimed Pursuant to Section 22 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act, As Amended
Chapter 98Special classification provisions
Chapter 99Temporary legislation; temporary modifications proclaimed pursuant to trade agreements legislation; additional import restrictions proclaimed pursuant to section 22 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act, as amended

Annex A - Schedule C, Classification of Country and Territory Designations for U.S. Import Statistics
Annex B - International Standard Country Codes
Annex C - Schedule D, Customs District and Port Codes

This page contains the chapter-by-chapter listing of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule and general notes.  The links below correspond to ...